Portraits of Pioneers in Psychology - Vol. 3

By Gregory A. Kimble; Michael C. Wertheimer | Go to book overview

Portraits of the Authors and Editors

John K. Bare, who wrote the chapter on Laurens Perseus Hickok, received his undergraduate education at Oberlin College. He studied for the Ph.D. degree at Brown University, where he learned from Walter S. Hunter, Carl Pfaffmann, Joseph McVicker Hunt, Clarence Graham, Lorrin A. Riggs, Donald B. Lindsley, Harold Schlosberg, and Gregory A. Kimble. After his Ph.D. he taught for 9 years at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. He then moved to Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, where he stayed for 25 years, until his retirement in 1983. He is currently Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Carleton. In writing a history of the psychology department at Carleton, Bare discovered that Hickok Empirical Psychology was the first text to be used there. His intrigue with the title, the author, and the early date of that publication led him to write this chapter.

Victor W. Bergenn, co-author of the chapter on Myrtle McGraw, was born in New York City and attended Columbia University. He received his M.A. and Ed.D. degrees at Teachers College. He worked at the New York State Psychiatric Institute on Biometrics Research and then taught at Briarcliff College, where he was a colleague of Myrtle McGraw. He then became executive director of the Council on Educational Psychology in 1972. McGraw served as the first president of the Council from 1972 to 1988. The Council is actively engaged in the reform of educational testing policies affecting students in the greater New York metropolitan area. Bergenn is a co-author of several articles on McGraw life and work and co-editor of a book of her collected essays, Beyond Heredity and Environment: Myrtle McGraw and the Maturation Controversy.

Daniel W. Bjork, author of the chapter on Burrhus Frederick Skinner, received his B. Ed. and M.A. degrees from the University of Toledo and a Ph.D. degree in American intellectual history from the University of Oklahoma, where he developed an interest in the history of psychology. He has published four books, three of which combine intellectual history and the history of psychology: The Compromised Scientist: William James in the Development of American Psychology ( 1983); William James: The Center of His Vision ( 1988, reprinted by APA Books, 1997); and the first major biography of Skinner, B.E Skinner. A Life ( 1993, reprinted by APA Books, 1997). He has taught at the University of Alabama, Birmingham; the University of Oklahoma; and the Mercy College of Detroit. Since 1991 he has been Chair of the Department of History at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas. There he lives with his wife Rhonda and two children.

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