A Study in Boss Politics: William Lorimer of Chicago

By Joel Arthur Tarr | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
A Boss out of Power, 1904-08

WHAT DOES A BOSS Do when he has lost control of the political structure? What means does he use to regain power? Where does he find allies? These questions faced Lorimer during the years after his defeat in 1904. His prime aim was to restore the strength of his organization, but this would be no easy task. Against him he had Governor Deneen, Roy O. West, chairman of the state central committee, James Reddick, new chairman of the county central committee, and powerful factional chieftains like Fred Busse and James Pease. In addition, a new wave of reformism was sweeping American cities such as Chicago. Progressives pushed measures such as the direct primary, the initiative, referendum, and recall, the short ballot, civil service, charter reform, and legislative reference bureaus both to break the hold of machine politicians over government and to streamline its workings.1

Reformers also hoped to change the class and ethnic origins of government officials. Thus, while their rhetoric was often infused with a democratic spirit, the reforms they advocated such as the direct primary were tactical weapons, not ends in themselves. Some progressives, such as Jane Addams and Raymond Robins, believed in democracy, but others, such as Walter L. Fisher and Victor Lawson, were motivated more by a desire for efficient and expert administration than a wish to give power to the people.2 Overtones of elitism and nativism within the progressive program, as well as the threat

____________________
1
George E. Mowry, The Era of Theodore Roosevelt, 1900-1912 ( New York, 1958), 59-68; Blake McKelvey, The Urbanization of America 1860-1915 ( New Brunswick, 1963), 86-114.
2
Miller, "Politics of Municipal Reform in Chicago,"38-41; Hays, "The Politics of Reform,"163-164.

-172-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Study in Boss Politics: William Lorimer of Chicago
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 378

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.