A Study in Boss Politics: William Lorimer of Chicago

By Joel Arthur Tarr | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
A Note on the Analysis of Chicago Voting Behavior

THE INTIERPRETATIONS of voting behavior in this work rest mainly upon a statistical analysis of Chicago election and demographic data. Election returns were obtained from the Chicago Daily News Almanac, and from manuscript sources in the Chicago Municipal Reference Library and the office of the Chicago Board of Election Commissioners.

The principal sources for determining the ethnic composition of Chicago wards were the school censuses printed in the Annual Reports of the Chicago Board of Education for 1894, 1904, 1906, and 1908; the "Composition of Chicago's Vote-1892," a chart printed in the Chicago Daily News Almanac for 1894, 318 (totals corrected for errors), giving the nationality of Chicago's electorate in 1892; and the population schedules for Chicago given in the eleventh, twelfth, and thirteenth U.S. censuses.

Information pertaining to the class character of wards was obtained from school attendance figures in the Annual Reports of the Chicago Board of Education for 1894, 1904, 1906, and 1908; from mortality rates in the "Vital Statistics" volumes of the eleventh, twelfth, and thirteenth U.S. censuses; from a qualitative description of each Chicago ward in Vital Statistics: Cities of 100,000 and Upwards, U.S. Eleventh Census, IV, Pt. 2, 161-181; and from illiteracy and school attendance figures for Chicago in the thirteenth U.S. census.

Securing information concerning the religious composition of Chicago wards was most difficult. Sources for the 1890- 1900 period were supplied to the author by Paul J. Kleppner, who had determined the religious character of Chicago wards for his doctoral dissertation, "The Politics of Change in the Midwest: The 1890's in Historical and Behavorial Perspective" ( University of Pittsburgh, 1967). For the 1900-1912 period, estimates were made based upon the ethnic composition of wards; the location of churches within wards; the U.S. Bureau of the Census, Special Reports, Religious Bodies: 1906 ( 2 vols., Washington, 1910); and from information in various secondary works.

The election and demographic data were fed into an IBM 360 computer. The program rank-ordered Chicago wards according to the political or demographic variable involved. (A rank order consists of listing a number of units [wards] from highest to lowest according to some common quality.) Spearman rank-order correlations were then run between the

-317-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Study in Boss Politics: William Lorimer of Chicago
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 378

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.