A Study of Error: A Summary and Evaluation of Methods Used in Six Years of Study of the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board

By Carl C. Brigham | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
Synonyms

The scholastic aptitude test was administered in slightly less than three hours, the last half hour of the examination period being devoted to experimental material which might prove useful in future tests. A certain number of tests -- nine in 1926 and 1927, seven in 1928, and six in 1929 -- were common to all forms, and the candidates were scored on the basis of these common tests only, the experimental. tests being used for subsequent study. By publishing several experimental sections each year, it was possible to investigate many problems and to make detailed studies of the separate test items or questions. Some forty-five hundred test items were studied in this way. The present chapter is devoted to an exposition of the data derived from one of these tests.

The synonym test was suggested by Professor Charles L. Stone of Dartmouth College, and 230 items prepared by him were included in one of the experimental sections (sub-test ten, Form B4) in 1927. It was subsequently found that this number of items (230) was excessive for the half-hour time limit, and the number was reduced to 175 in the Form C experimental section (sub-test eight, Form C10) and to 115 in the Form D experimental section (sub-test seven Form D9). The new experimental items studied in Forms C and D were prepared by the writer. One hundred items selected from Form B4 were included as sub-test one Form C given with a fifteen-minute time limit. Thirty-six of the one hundred items used in sub-test one Form D were repeated from sub-test one Form C, two items were drawn from Form B4, and the remaining sixty-two items were selected from Form C10, the 1928 experimental section. The three experimental sections given with the thirty-minute time limit will be referred to subsequently as B4, C10 and D9. The two one-hundred-item tests given with the fifteen- minute time limit in Forms C and D will be referred to as Ct, and Dt. The number of the item to which reference is made will follow the reference to the form, as B4227 (the 227th item in Form B4), Ct10 (the 10th item in sub-test one Form C), etc.

In studying the experimental sections in Forms B, C, and D, all papers of final candidates who happened to take these particular experimental sections were used. As eleven experimental sections were given in 1927 and 1929, the number of individuals taking B4 and D9 was about the same (643 and 655). As thirteen experimental sections were used in 1928, the number taking C10 was smaller (575).

The procedure used in obtaining a random sampling of the total group in each experimental section was as follows: after the printing of each form was completed, the papers were arranged in order B1, B2, B3 . . . B11, B1, B2, etc. The booklets

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Study of Error: A Summary and Evaluation of Methods Used in Six Years of Study of the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.