The Second Tory Party, 1714-1832

By Keith Grahame Feiling | Go to book overview

I
THE PROBLEM AND ITS CONDITIONS

IN 1727 Swift met Bolingbroke, Pope, and Arbuthnot for the last time; that autumn he went back to Ireland for good, and the Augustan circle was dispersed. The next summer Pope took a riding tour on an elderly pony that rolled Lord Cobham's lawns at Stowe; only on his journey did he discover that this veteran had been brave Derwentwater's charger in the '15.

Much the same is our first impression of party history in the eighteenth century. It moves at a jog-trot, all battle and tumult gone, on the flat plain which lies between the storms of Queen Anne's reign and the passion of the French Revolution. Was there, then, no continuity whatever between the party of Bolingbroke and the party of Pitt and Canning? and if there were Tories in those days, who should be taken as their type? Historians have given every sort of answer; some holding that the Tories were still the party of the Church, others that they had sunk to mere faction; some making Mansfield the essential Tory, some North, and others, again, the younger Pitt.

Only one relic of the Augustan Tories lingered on into the youth of Pitt and Dundas. This was Allen first Lord Bathurst, one of the famous 'twelve' created to carry the Peace of Utrecht, dear friend of Pope and all his circle. His prescription, he once told Swift, was to laugh as long as he lived, and laughter seemed to make life long, for he had spoken to Richard Cromwell and lived to see his own son Chancellor in the North ministry; 'now the old gentleman has gone to bed,' this youthful father would say, 'let us have another bottle'. He had swiftly abandoned Jacobitism, spoke of his Tory friends as 'the country party',* took office under Carteret, and was thought of as governor for George III. But his sober son burned his correspondence with all the links it might have given us in his party's transition.

____________________
B
*
Bathurst to Strafford, 13 May 1734, Add. 22221.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Second Tory Party, 1714-1832
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.