The Second Tory Party, 1714-1832

By Keith Grahame Feiling | Go to book overview

XIII
THE BREAKING OF THE PITT PARTY
1800-1806

THE Cabinet was wearing out. Pitt's health was destroyed, Sir Walter Farquhar and other doctors were always being called in; Dundas had trouble with his heart, complaining 'I do not sleep at all'.*

In personnel they were little changed, and what change there was did not look towards party. When North's old protégé Mansfield died in 1796, Chatham took his place as Lord President. The Privy Seal thus empty, being declined by Devonshire, another Whig whom Pitt wished to secure, went in due course to his old Cambridge friend Westmorland, whose Irish experience had made him very reactionary and whose habits labelled him later, justly or unjustly, as the 'Sot Privé'. Auckland came in as Postmaster General, receiving later a joint colleague in young Gower, and while old Jenky was Earl of Liverpool now, young Jenky was Master of the Mint; in all of which there seems little but a wish for good business heads, or deference to old political friendship. If the coalition Whigs took some offence, Pitt soothed them by apology for changes for which he knew they could not have 'any particular partiality', or by giving to the offended Fitzwilliam the West Riding lordlieutenancy, which was taken from that very rough diamond the Duke of Norfolk for toasting 'the sovereign people'. Pitt's personal following were fast climbing the lower rungs. Canning moved from the under-secretaryship at the Foreign Office to be Paymaster, Dudley Ryder took over the Navy treasurership, one of Dundas's many activities, and Huskisson was Dundas's right hand. With all of which the House of Grenville were ill content. Brother Tom had been promised something when he helped to make the Coalition Government--was he to be

____________________
*
Dundas to Spencer, Nov. 1796, Althorp Mss.
Pitt to Windham, 13 Feb. 1798, Add. 37894.

-213-

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The Second Tory Party, 1714-1832
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I- The Problem and Its Conditions 1
  • II- In the Wilderness 1714-1727 13
  • III- Sir Robert 24
  • I- Fusion and Confusion 1742-1754 39
  • V- The Watershed- I 1754-1760 58
  • VI- The Watershed- II 1760-1765 68
  • VII- The Watershed- III 1765-1768 87
  • VIII- The New Parties 1768-1774 99
  • IX 122
  • X- The Divide 1782-1784 143
  • XI- The Party of Mr. Pitt 1784-1792 164
  • XIII- The Breaking of the Pitt Party 1800-1806 213
  • XIV- The Age of Faction 1806-1812 247
  • XV- Aftermath of War 1813-1820 276
  • XVI- Breaking-Point (1820-1826) 304
  • XVII- The Break 1826-1830 345
  • XVIII- Finale 384
  • Authorities 405
  • Notes 409
  • Index 425
  • By the Same Author British Foreign Policy 1660-1672 *
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