The Second Tory Party, 1714-1832

By Keith Grahame Feiling | Go to book overview

XVII
THE BREAK
1826-1830

'ABEYANCE' would not hold Government together much longer. Ultra circles were hysterical; ex-Irish Redesdale swore 'liberality' would destroy our institutions; Duke of Newcastle vowed loyal men must overthrow 'all that is wrong and rotten'; 'cheerful Charlie' Rutland loathed 'political theorists without a foot of land of their own'. In his holiday at Walmer the Prime Minister found the Kent squires 'sore and sulky' with suspicion of Huskisson; 'you and I', he told Canning, must manage the Corn question, 'not a pleasant undertaking for either of us'.* But then nothing was pleasant. He was having sleepless nights through the controversy with Wellington over that wretched Gerald Valerian; Eldon was more than usually disagreeable, their conversation taking the form (we hear) of 'damns' on one side and sighs on the other. And, much more serious, differences between Canning and Wellington over the past, present, and future of foreign policy, threatened a complete smash. (1)

With Wellington's almost dumb assistance Canning had pushed Russia into the liberal camp over Greece, thus isolating Metternich, and in this summer vacation he visited Paris, a fact which the Duke found highly objectionable in itself and infinitely more so in its sequel. King John of Portugal had just died, his son Pedro of Brazil abdicated in favour of a young daughter, who in due course was to heal the dynastic feud by marrying her reactionary uncle Miguel. Portugal should enjoy a liberal constitution which meant, Wellington said, 'licentious Chambers' and 'a licentious Press', but a constitution at any rate to which Miguel in his exile at Vienna should swear allegiance. When Miguelists, with Spanish support and Metternich's

____________________
*
Liverpool to Canning, 29 Aug., Add. 38748.
Arbuthnot to Peel, 3 Nov., Add. 40340.

-345-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Second Tory Party, 1714-1832
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I- The Problem and Its Conditions 1
  • II- In the Wilderness 1714-1727 13
  • III- Sir Robert 24
  • I- Fusion and Confusion 1742-1754 39
  • V- The Watershed- I 1754-1760 58
  • VI- The Watershed- II 1760-1765 68
  • VII- The Watershed- III 1765-1768 87
  • VIII- The New Parties 1768-1774 99
  • IX 122
  • X- The Divide 1782-1784 143
  • XI- The Party of Mr. Pitt 1784-1792 164
  • XIII- The Breaking of the Pitt Party 1800-1806 213
  • XIV- The Age of Faction 1806-1812 247
  • XV- Aftermath of War 1813-1820 276
  • XVI- Breaking-Point (1820-1826) 304
  • XVII- The Break 1826-1830 345
  • XVIII- Finale 384
  • Authorities 405
  • Notes 409
  • Index 425
  • By the Same Author British Foreign Policy 1660-1672 *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.