The Empire of the Tsars and the Russians

By Anatole L. Leroy-Beaulieu; Zaenaefde A. Ragozin | Go to book overview

BOOK III.
THE NATIONAL TEMPERAMENT AND CHARACTER.

CHAPTER I.

Utility and Difficulty of Studying the National Character-- Russia One of the Countries Where Material Surroundings Act Most on Man--Some Effects of the Climate--The North, and Sluggishness Brought on by Cold--Winter and the Intermittence of Labor--Lack of Liking for Physical Exertion--Habitual Insufficiency of Food; Drunkenness; Hygiene and Mortality--Cold and Uncleanliness at Home in the North --Are Northern Countries More Favorable to Morality?

IT is something to know the origin of a people and the land they inhabit. It is not much if one cannot account for the influence of nature on man. From this action of the outer world and from the people's historical or religious training results the national character. Now nations do their politics as private people transact their business, temperament being a factor as well as self-interest.

For the character of a nation, like that of a man, depends on the temperament or blood, on the physical surroundings and on the moral training, not to mention what, in an individual is contributed by age, and, in a nation, by a long course of civilization. Between these three orders of influences--race, nature, historynow one, now another, has been awarded pre-eminence in the study of nations. All three have their importance; but, nations being, even more than individuals, of mixed blood, what is most difficult to determine is the share to be allotted to race and hered

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The Empire of the Tsars and the Russians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • A Word from the Translator. iii
  • Author's Preface. Written Expressly for the American Edition. vii
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Maps xxi
  • Part I. the Country and Its Inhabitants xxiii
  • Book I. Nature, Climate, and Soil. 1
  • Book I. Chapter Ii. 15
  • Book I. Chapter Iii. 35
  • Book Ii. Races and Nationality. 54
  • Book Ii. Chapter Ii. 63
  • Book Ii. Chapter Iii. 77
  • Book Ii. Chapter Iv. 95
  • Book Ii. Chapter V. 122
  • Book III. the National Temperament and Character. 138
  • Book Iii. Chapter Ii. 161
  • Book Iii. Chapter Iii. 179
  • Book Iii. Chapter Iv. 195
  • Book Iv. History and the Elements of Civilization. 223
  • Book Iv. Chapter Ii. 241
  • Book Iv. Chapter Iii. 256
  • Book Iv. Chapter Iv. 282
  • Book V. the Social Hierarchy: the Towns and Urban Classes. 305
  • Book V. Chapter Ii. 322
  • Book V. Chapter Iii. 334
  • Book Vi. Nobility and Tchin. 346
  • Book Vi. Chapter Ii. 362
  • Book Vi. Chapter Iii. 381
  • Book Vi. Chapter Iv. 390
  • Book VII the Peasant and the Emancipation. 403
  • Book Vii. Chapter Ii. 422
  • Book Vii. Chapter Iii. 436
  • Book VII Chapter Iv. 450
  • Book VIII. Mir, Family, and Village Communities. 474
  • Book Viii. Chapter Ii. 486
  • Book Viii. Chapter Iii. 505
  • Book Viii. Chapter Iv. 521
  • Book Viii. Chapter V. 534
  • Book Viii. Chapter Vl. 548
  • Book Viii. Chapter Vii. 563
  • Index 581
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