The Empire of the Tsars and the Russians

By Anatole L. Leroy-Beaulieu; Zaenaefde A. Ragozin | Go to book overview

BOOK IV. CHAPTER III.

The Tatar Domination, its Effects on the National Manners and Character --On the Reigning Family and Political Status--Causes and Character of the Moscovite Autocracy--In what the Russia of the Seventeenth Century Differed from the West of the same Period--Gaps in Russian History.

THE invasion of the Mongols, in the beginning of the thirteenth century, snapped the thread of Russia's destinies. The consequences of this terrible event were peculiar to Russia; the causes were not. This catastrophe, seemingly isolated, was only an incident in the great struggle between Europe and Asia, of which the crusades were the chief incident. In this collision of two worlds the same causes were at work from the Russian steppes to the Spanish sierras. Russia defended the left wing of Christendom against the immense converging host which advanced from Asia and Africa, in the shape of a gigantic crescent, ready to extend its extremities so as to coil itself round Europe, while Spain defended the right wing, and France and England, Italy and Germany, boldly taking the offensive, attacked the enemy's centre by means of the crusades. Russia had done that sort of fighting, in her own southern deserts, against the Petchenègs, the Pòlovtsy, and other nomads of Turkish race, bearing the brunt of the strife against Asia, long before the great invasion of the thir teenth century. Being placed at the most perilous outpost, in the neighborhood of the most extensive gathering-place of the Barbarians, her fall was a foregone conclusion. The Russian princes, united against the hosts of Djinghiz-Khan, had valiantly held out against the first shock on the Kalka ( 1224). A second invasion

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The Empire of the Tsars and the Russians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • A Word from the Translator. iii
  • Author's Preface. Written Expressly for the American Edition. vii
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Maps xxi
  • Part I. the Country and Its Inhabitants xxiii
  • Book I. Nature, Climate, and Soil. 1
  • Book I. Chapter Ii. 15
  • Book I. Chapter Iii. 35
  • Book Ii. Races and Nationality. 54
  • Book Ii. Chapter Ii. 63
  • Book Ii. Chapter Iii. 77
  • Book Ii. Chapter Iv. 95
  • Book Ii. Chapter V. 122
  • Book III. the National Temperament and Character. 138
  • Book Iii. Chapter Ii. 161
  • Book Iii. Chapter Iii. 179
  • Book Iii. Chapter Iv. 195
  • Book Iv. History and the Elements of Civilization. 223
  • Book Iv. Chapter Ii. 241
  • Book Iv. Chapter Iii. 256
  • Book Iv. Chapter Iv. 282
  • Book V. the Social Hierarchy: the Towns and Urban Classes. 305
  • Book V. Chapter Ii. 322
  • Book V. Chapter Iii. 334
  • Book Vi. Nobility and Tchin. 346
  • Book Vi. Chapter Ii. 362
  • Book Vi. Chapter Iii. 381
  • Book Vi. Chapter Iv. 390
  • Book VII the Peasant and the Emancipation. 403
  • Book Vii. Chapter Ii. 422
  • Book Vii. Chapter Iii. 436
  • Book VII Chapter Iv. 450
  • Book VIII. Mir, Family, and Village Communities. 474
  • Book Viii. Chapter Ii. 486
  • Book Viii. Chapter Iii. 505
  • Book Viii. Chapter Iv. 521
  • Book Viii. Chapter V. 534
  • Book Viii. Chapter Vl. 548
  • Book Viii. Chapter Vii. 563
  • Index 581
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