The Empire of the Tsars and the Russians

By Anatole L. Leroy-Beaulieu; Zaenaefde A. Ragozin | Go to book overview

BOOK V. CHAPTER III.

Classification of the Urban Population since Catherine II.--The Mechanic
and the Miésh-tchanìn or "Small Burgher"--Urban Proletariate--How
this Class has, as a Rule, Preserved the same Spirit as the Rural Popula-
tion--The Merchant Guilds and their Privileges--How Emancipation
has Made it Possible for them to Own Real Estate--The "Honorary
Citizens" or "Notables" among the Townspeople--Russia, till very
Lately, Had none of the Professions out of which the Western Bour-
geoisie
Used to be Recruited--In how far the Reforms Help Create a
Middle Class in the European Sense.

THE town population, ever since Peter I. and Catherine II., has been classed under five or six rubrics, themselves divided into two main categories: the wholesale traders, forming a superior class, which was long a privileged one; and the retail traders, the mechanics of all sorts, subdivided into several categories, differing only in name. There are the poorer townspeople,--the mechanics,--the members of trade corporations, and lastly the "miscellany," a sort of town-rabble, containing all those who do not fit into any particular class. Of these categories, the first is the most important, and can be regarded as the type of the entire lower class of the urban population. Its name, miêsh-tchanìn, is usually translated in French bourgeois, yet the man thus designated answers little enough to the French term. The miêshtchanìn* is a person who dwells in towns and who, being neither noble nor priest, is not rich enough to inscribe his name on the roll of the merchants, yet does not belong to a trade corporation. He usually gets his livelihood from some small business or some

____________________
*
Miêsh-tchanìn, plural miêsh-tchánié, from miêsto, "a place," which gives the diminutive miês-tiétch-ko, "a borough, a small town."

-334-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Empire of the Tsars and the Russians
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 588

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.