The Empire of the Tsars and the Russians

By Anatole L. Leroy-Beaulieu; Zaenaefde A. Ragozin | Go to book overview

BOOK VIII. CHAPTER Vl.

The Manner of Dissolving a Community--The Peasants of any Village are Always Free to Suppress the Mir--Why they don't Do it more Frequently--What they Think of the Mir--How the Mir has No Objection Whatever to Individual Property, even though it Usually Upholds the Communal System--Purchases of Land by Peasants--Distribution of the Arable Lands between the Communes and Other Proprietors-- Utility and Functions of Personal Property--Can Both Modes of Tenure Co-Exist Some Day?

WHAT is the ultimate fate of the rural communes to be? and shall a decision on this head be postponed until they are free from all the encumbrances which crush them, and have become real and full proprietors of the land allotted them--or, do the difficulties that at present beset them make it desirable to come to a decision at once and to cut down at the root that gigantic growth of centuries, the mir, without first attempting to trim it down and to rid it of the parasitical plants which choke it?

Few are those who demand the immediate abrogation of the mir, but many those who wish for measures that should prepare and ensure its gradual disparition. Even now village communes are not indissoluble. The law, while upholding them, leaves to the members the privilege of abolishing them by instituting a final division of the communal domain between themselves. Nothing more is needed for that than a resolution passed by the assembled community, by a majority of not less than two thirds.* The an

____________________
*
More than that: the Statute, doubtless with a view to safeguard the quondam serf's right of choosing the mode of tenure which best suits him, has an article--Art. 165 of the Redemption Regulation--which empowers single peasants to withdraw their lot from the common domain, provided

-548-

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The Empire of the Tsars and the Russians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • A Word from the Translator. iii
  • Author's Preface. Written Expressly for the American Edition. vii
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Maps xxi
  • Part I. the Country and Its Inhabitants xxiii
  • Book I. Nature, Climate, and Soil. 1
  • Book I. Chapter Ii. 15
  • Book I. Chapter Iii. 35
  • Book Ii. Races and Nationality. 54
  • Book Ii. Chapter Ii. 63
  • Book Ii. Chapter Iii. 77
  • Book Ii. Chapter Iv. 95
  • Book Ii. Chapter V. 122
  • Book III. the National Temperament and Character. 138
  • Book Iii. Chapter Ii. 161
  • Book Iii. Chapter Iii. 179
  • Book Iii. Chapter Iv. 195
  • Book Iv. History and the Elements of Civilization. 223
  • Book Iv. Chapter Ii. 241
  • Book Iv. Chapter Iii. 256
  • Book Iv. Chapter Iv. 282
  • Book V. the Social Hierarchy: the Towns and Urban Classes. 305
  • Book V. Chapter Ii. 322
  • Book V. Chapter Iii. 334
  • Book Vi. Nobility and Tchin. 346
  • Book Vi. Chapter Ii. 362
  • Book Vi. Chapter Iii. 381
  • Book Vi. Chapter Iv. 390
  • Book VII the Peasant and the Emancipation. 403
  • Book Vii. Chapter Ii. 422
  • Book Vii. Chapter Iii. 436
  • Book VII Chapter Iv. 450
  • Book VIII. Mir, Family, and Village Communities. 474
  • Book Viii. Chapter Ii. 486
  • Book Viii. Chapter Iii. 505
  • Book Viii. Chapter Iv. 521
  • Book Viii. Chapter V. 534
  • Book Viii. Chapter Vl. 548
  • Book Viii. Chapter Vii. 563
  • Index 581
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