Debussy: Musician of France

By Victor I. Seroff | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXII
BALLETS

"TO TELL THE TRUTH, Le Martyre de Saint Sébastien tired me far more than I thought possible, and the trip to Turin finished me completely," Debussy said upon his return from Italy. He had a long program of French music to conduct, including Emmanuel Chabrier's Gwendoline overture, Roger Ducasse Sarabande, the Prelude to the Third Act of Ariane et Barbe-Bleue by Paul Dukas, and his own Children's Corner (orchestrated by Caplet), L'Aprèsmidi d'un Faune, and Ibéria. He collapsed during the performance (June 25), and an assistant conductor had to be called in to complete the concert. Debussy blamed it on the heat, his health and fatigue. "This is how you pay for everything in this world! The old saying goes: 'Do not force your talent' and a more modern version of it is: 'Let us not be carried away.'" His doctor ordered him to rest for at least a month, but not until the end of July were the Debussys able to leave Paris and go to Houlgate, in Normandy, for the summer.

To have "something to work on," Debussy took the manuscript of the Rapsodie pour clarinette with him. He was going to orchestrate it, for he was sure that the pleasures of Houlgate would not be sufficient to distract him from his work on Poe's two stories. But to his surprise he found the little place pleasanter than he anticipated -- the country air, the sea, and even the few people he met. He complained, however, about the "hotel life" -- it was not for a man of his age, he said. There was a woman who sang one Massenet opera a day; Debussy declared it must have been prescribed for her

-303-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Debussy: Musician of France
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 367

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.