Nazis, Communists, Klansmen, and Others on the Fringe: Political Extremism in America

By John George; Laird Wilcox | Go to book overview
Save to active project

31 The LaRouche Network

During the 1970s and 1980s it often seemed that the media had given the man two extra names. Most common references to him began: "Political extremist Lyndon H. LaRouche." Few would deny that the label was warranted--LaRouche's pronouncements and demeanor, as well as those of his associates, virtually personify the extremist style. He is one of the most accomplished and inventive conspiracy theorists on the entire political spectrum, and his organization has a well-deserved reputation for conducting smear campaigns against various targets, among whom have been Walter Mondale, Henry Kissinger, David Rockefeller, and the queen of England.

Other appellations applied to LaRouche have included "Communist," "Trotskyist," "former leftist," "neo-Nazi," "Stalinist," "Democratic candidate," "Marxist-Leninist," "cult leader," "small-time Hitler," "demagogue," "kook," "Hitlerian hate-monger," and "anti-Semite." (Ironically, most of these labels came from LaRouche opponents who object to his penchant for name-calling.) Depending upon what one focuses on and what one ignores it would be possible to make a case for each of the above epithets. It could also be argued that to one degree or another LaRouche contains elements of all of them. One thing is very certain: Lyndon LaRouche has spent much of the past twenty years cultivating a vast array of enemies, some of them not much less "extremist" than he. On the other hand, his distorted view of the world and his demonstrated hostility toward various groups, including Jews, has produced some justifiable alarm.

Lyndon Hermyle LaRouche, Jr., was born in 1922 to Quaker parents and grew up in Lynn, Massachusetts. He entered the U.S. Army as a conscientious objector in World War II, during which he served as a medic in Burma. While in Calcutta, India, he joined the Communist party. After the war he was a Communist Party USA (CPUSA) member for a few years; in 1949 he joined the Socialist Workers party (SWP), the principal U.S. Trotskyist group. He used the party name, Lyn Marcus. In all, he spent seventeen years in the SWP. His first wife, Janice Neuberger, was also a member. After their divorce he lived with another SWP member, Carol Schnitzer, who was still with him during the early years of his National Caucus of Labor Committees. 1

Although a committed Marxist-Leninist, LaRouche was always contentious and restless. He was secretly involved with embittered former SWP members, including Tim Wohlforth and his American Committee for the Fourth International, a small Trotskyist splinter group. In 1966 LaRouche was expelled from the SWP for working to organize a schism in the Trotskyist movement with Gerald Healy,

-312-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nazis, Communists, Klansmen, and Others on the Fringe: Political Extremism in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 530

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?