Sectors of American Judaism: Reform, Orthodoxy, Conservatism, and Reconstructionism

By Jacob Neusner | Go to book overview

PREFACE

In this second and concluding part of the present anthology, we turn from the local synagogue and rabbi to what is referred to as "the national scene." We continue to stress the simple facts of organized Judaism in America, and so, on the "national scene," we examine the large groupings of synagogues and rabbis formed into what people call "movements," e.g., "the Reform Movement," or "the Conservative Movement in Judaism."

I prefer the term "sector" to stress that Judaism in America is a single religious tradition, spread across a spectrum of practices, to a lesser extent, of beliefs as well, but essentially a unified and unitary structure. All elements which constitute American Judaism derive from classical, or Rabbinic, Judaism. All refer to the sacred literature, the theology, the symbols and religious rites, of Rabbinic Judaism. The differences among the several elements are stated in terms of Rabbinic Judaism, and appeal to the authority of "the ancient rabbis" characterizes all the organized manifestations of Judaism. Accordingly, we deal with expressions of a single religion, sectors of one religious tradition.

To be sure, much is made of the differences between one sector and another. Yet the observer, standing at the outside, will also discern a great deal characteristic of all sectors in common. Above all, a single set of questions and agendum of programs is shared among all sectors. While the superficial differences cannot be ignored, the commonalities also should not be overlooked.

Each group sees itself as "Judaism." This claim is phrased in various ways. Each finds language suitable for its conception that, in the end, it is really right. The Orthodox state matters baldly: Orthodoxy is the sole "legitimate" or "authentic" expression of Judaic tradition now, just as in the past. Conservatism tends to pretend it is co-extensive with the whole of Judaism. As Rabbi Waxman says, "It is Judaism." Speaking of catholic Israel and seeing itself as the vital center, Conservatism finds difficulty in admitting even its own existence. The claim of Reform is stated in terms of the development of Judaism. Reform is the natural and right outcome of the development of

-XIII-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sectors of American Judaism: Reform, Orthodoxy, Conservatism, and Reconstructionism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.