A More Perfect Union: The Impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on the Constitution

By Harold M. Hyman | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIX
The New Era

T he post-Appomattox reform pulse worked especially vigorously in northern cities. Mushrooming commercial and industrial centers along the northern Atlantic, Great Lakes, and major river shores attracted talented, vigorous veterans of the War's civil or military services and entrepreneurial management. These new urbanites rose swiftly to prominence in businesses, professions, and local politics; especially of Republican varieties. They rejected the individualistic, haphazard politics of their party's antislavery pioneers. Hustle, efficiency, organization, and success were their catchwords. "Push, labor, shove" were Cincinnati's ways, Rutherford Hayes wrote happily after he moved there; "these words are of great power in a city like this."

Urban amenities delighted the newcomers. They saw their augmenting communities as new frontiers blessed with entrepreneurial and cultural resources unknown on farms or in provincial towns. In 1865 they felt themselves to be on the brink of "a new era," wrote Yale law professor Theodore Woolsey. Boston public-health champion Samuel Eliot described this "age of great cities" as a profound social motion equal to emancipation or reunion.

Here was the rub. It was fine to enjoy interior toilets, piped water, illuminants, and fuels; fire, police, and sanitary services; and urban shops and markets. But sometimes the city's advantages became offensive to the senses, dangerous to health, and repugnant to war-heightened notions of pure public service. Rising property taxes and insurance rates during and after the

-326-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A More Perfect Union: The Impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on the Constitution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 588

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.