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E. E. Cummings and the Critics

Edited, with an Introduction by S. V. BAUM

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS

EAST LANSING, MICHIGAN

-iii-

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e. e. cummings and the Critics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Cummings and the Critics vii
  • Part I 1
  • [strainings and Obscurities] 3
  • Syrinx 5
  • Part II 19
  • Flare and Blare 21
  • Part III 29
  • People Stare Carefully 31
  • Modernist Poetry and the Plain Reader's Rights. 34
  • Part IV 45
  • H I M 47
  • Notes on E. E. Cummings' Language 50
  • Part V 69
  • Cummings's Non-Land of Un- 71
  • When We Were Very Young 73
  • Part VI 85
  • Two Views of Cummings 87
  • [merely A Penumbra] 93
  • The Poems and Prose of E.E. Cummings 99
  • Part VII 111
  • Part VIII 115
  • [an American Poet] 117
  • Technique as Joy 119
  • Prosody as the Meaning 124
  • Cummings Times One 133
  • Part IX - Anti-Semitism and E. E. Cummings: [a Critical Round Robin] 171
  • Fundamentally He Is Nothing 173
  • Does Not See Anti-Semitism 178
  • Combines Both Evil and Art 179
  • Artist Must Have Freedom 181
  • Part X 183
  • E.E. Cummings and His Fathers 185
  • Part XI 189
  • A Poet's Own Way 191
  • [the Imaginative Direction of Our Time] 193
  • By E E C: A Primary Bibliography 195
  • About E E C: A Secondary Bibliography 196
  • Index of Poems Quoted 215
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