Conservative Radicalism: A Sociology of Conservative Party Youth Structures and Libertarianism, 1970-1992

By Timothy Evans | Go to book overview
If -- as it seems -- people do pack up at university ideas that sustain them through the intellectual journeys of their lives it naturally follows that what today's Conservative youth activists believe is of profound importance for the political future of not only the Conservative Party, but the United Kingdom as a whole. However, to understand fully the nature and importance of Libertarian youth activism it is necessary first to go back and examine its rise within the Federation of Conservative Students in the period from 1970 to 1986. For it is here that the story of the transformation of what it means to be a Conservative Party member took off. It is here that Libertarianism began to permeate the organisation nationally and where some of its members embarked upon the ideological road to anarcho-capitalism.
Notes and References
1. According to Norton and Aughey: 'The YCs reached a peak of 157,000 members in 1949.' See: Norton, P., and Aughey, A., ( 1981) Conservatives and Conservatism, London, Temple Smith, p. 213.
2. Burke, E., ( 1912) Reflections on the Revolution in France, London, Dent, first published 1790. Burke, E., ( 1962) An Appeal from the New Whigs to the Old New York, Indianapolis, first published in 1791.
3. Burke cited in: Stankiewicz, W. J., (ed.) ( 1964) Political Thought Since World War Two, New York, Free Press, p. 358. The example of Burke underlines the difference between what is called Conservatism in the English-speaking countries and what is called Conservatism in Europe. European Conservatism is quite clearly and wholeheartedly an anti-individualist, anti-capitalist ideological phenomenon, a reaction to the Enlightenment and to liberal individualism as both an analytical and normative perspective. See: Nisbet, R. A., "'Conservatism and Sociology'", American Journal of Sociology, Vol. LVIII, No. 2, September 1952 and "'De Bonald and the Concept of the Social Group'", Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. V, No. 3, June 1944. Its collectivism in turn can be seen as a formative influence upon both the origins of sociology and indeed upon socialism and Marxism. Although there are elements of such perspectives in Burke's traditionalism, there are equally clearly many elements of both political and economic liberalism. See: Dunn, William Clyde, "'Adam Smith and Edmund Burke: Complimentary Contemporaries'", Southern Economic Journal, Vol. VII, No. 3 January 1941. See also Connor Cruise O'Brien's recent biography, The Great Melody: A Thematic Biography and Commentated Anthology of Edmund Burke, London, Sinclair Stevenson, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, which portrays Burke as essentially a Liberal. The attempt to make of Burke an icon of extreme traditionalism, authoritarianism or 'pragmatic', unprincipled realpolitik by certain contemporary Conservatives is profoundly mistaken. Libertarians themselves have, with some glee, pointed this out. Thus, see Marks, P., ( 1994) The Principled Libertarianism of Edmund Burke(1729-1797), Libertarian Heritage No. 13, London, Libertarian Alliance, and Thomas, R., "'Edmund Burke, Liberty and Drugs'", Free Life: A Journal of Classical Liberal and Libertarian Thought, No. 21, November 1994, p. 7. The true heir to Burke is not William Waldegrave, with his quasi-Hegelian, statist, anti- free market pragmatism, but the late Michael Oakeshott, with his tolerant, economically liberal support for an open society.

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conservative Radicalism: A Sociology of Conservative Party Youth Structures and Libertarianism, 1970-1992
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 158

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.