Conservative Radicalism: A Sociology of Conservative Party Youth Structures and Libertarianism, 1970-1992

By Timothy Evans | Go to book overview

Chapter III
THE RISE OF THE YOUNG LIBERTARIAN RIGHT AND PSEUDO-LEFTIST EMULATION

This chapter traces the emergence of Libertarian thought within the FCS back to St Andrews University, and goes on to examine the movement's subsequent culture and politics. It links the attitudes, beliefs and behaviour of the Federation's Libertarian faction with an analysis of both their intellectual roots and their iconography. It concentrates on how the Conservative Party's young Libertarian right was influenced by a variety of free market authors, academics and pressure groups, and how their ideas related to the creation of a distinctly anarchistic political world-view.


3.1 The Role and Importance of the St Andrews Set

While it is always difficult to explain historical events and the precise nature of the relationship between individuals, their ideas and wider social factors such as class, there is little doubt that the St Andrews University Conservative Association had a major determining influence on the political orientation of the FCS in the 1970s. For St Andrews University was the place where a number of Conservative students gathered -- seemingly by accident -- who were to play a leading role in the subsequent rise of Libertarianism within the Federation. Although there were others, for instance at the London School of Economics, St Andrews emerged as the main staging post, the cat-

____________________

Notes for this section begin on page 74.

-50-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conservative Radicalism: A Sociology of Conservative Party Youth Structures and Libertarianism, 1970-1992
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 158

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.