The National Administration of the United States of America

By John A. Fairlie | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
THE DEPARTMENT OF WAR

References .-- L. D. INGERSOLL: History of the War Department ( 1879); Military Laws of the United States ( 1901); Army Regulations.-- R. P. THIAN: Legislative History of the General Staff of the Army of the United States (Senate Document, 1901, No. 229).-- D. Y. THOMAS : A History of Military Government in Newly Acquired Ter- ritory of the United States ( Columbia University Studies in Political Science, Vol. 20).-- T. H. HAMERSLEY: Army and Navy Register, 1776- 1887.--T. A. DODGE, in N. S. SHALER: United States, I, ch 11.-- Scribner's Magazine, 30:286-593; 33:661; 34:85.-- United Service Magazine, 4:309.-- North American Review, 168:385; 174:275.-- Atlantic Monthly, 89:437.-- Forum, 30:653; 33:151.-- Review of Reviews, 18:686.-- Harper's Monthly, 48:670; 49:101, 401.-- Ameri- can Law Review, 32:366.


WEST POINT ACADEMY

North American Review, 34:246; 52:23; 57:269; 159:61; 160:668.-- United Service, 9:366--International Monthly, 3:411.


RIVER AND HARBOR WORKS

Chief of Engineers, U. S. A., Annual Reports.--Lalor's Cyclopedia, on Internal Improvements.-- A. B. HART: Practical Essays, No. 9.--Journal of the Franklin Institute, 65:21; 139:343.--North American Review, 24:1; 51:130, 331; 158:343.--Annals Am. Acad, Soc. and Pol. Sci., 2:782.

THE history of the department of War, like that of the other departments thus far considered, begins with the Continental Congress; and the machinery for carrying on the Revolution- ary War was the first and most important branch of adminis- tration which that body had to undertake. In the colonies the management of military affairs had been under the immediate control of the governors, as the representatives of the Crown. The Continental Congress, however, had no single executive; and the early measures adopted were to appoint committees for particular business. One of the first committees of the

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