CHAPTER XIV
IMPERIAL RELATIONS

The discrepancy between legal theory and actual fact that is so pronounced a characteristic of the British Constitution is particularly marked in the case of the power of the Parliament at Westminster with respect to the British self-governing Dominions. These Dominions are, of course, the most important elements of what has long been known as the British Empire. As a matter of fact, this priority has, as is well known, caused in recent years far-reaching modification of the whole prevailing idea of empire. The existing situation is, like so many things British, the product of long historical development and the result of peculiar conditions.

The self-governing Dominions are to be contrasted not only with the United Kingdom, with which the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man are officially grouped; they are likewise to be distinguished from the remainder of "His Majesty's Dominions". Though this latter category technically includes such things as Dependencies, Protectorates, Spheres of Influence, Mandated Territories, and Areas of Chartered Companies, a consideration of British imperial relations involves, in addition to the self-governing Dominions, more especially the Crown Colonies and India.

The list of British self-governing Dominions is composed, at the present time, of Canada, Newfoundland, Australia, New Zealand, the Union of South Africa, the Irish Free State, and, perhaps, Southern Rhodesia. The administrative relations of these Dominions with the British Crown are managed by the Dominions Office. At the head of this Department is the Secretary of State for Dominion Affairs, an official created in 1925. Previous to the beginning of the nineteenth century, business

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Government of England
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 332

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.