Hail to Thee, Okoboji U! A Humor Anthology on Higher Education

By Mark C. Ebersole | Go to book overview

employer and friend, the New York Times observed that explorers in Africa might one day come upon the remains of the large, piano-shaped animal that ate Dr. Millmoss, together with the bones of its distinguished and unfortunate prey. Upon reading this, Ponsonby turned to a group of his friends at the Explorers' Club and said, "Too bad the old boy didn't live to reconstruct that."


Professor Gulliver Grebe's Adventures among the Snarfs

Pierre Berton

I had an interesting talk last week with one of the world's best-known explorers and anthropologists, Professor Gulliver Grebe, who has just returned from exploring the native civilizations of the Upper Amazon.

Professor Grebe tells me that this jungle fastness is not entirely inhabited by untutored savages. In fact, he spent more than a year studying one culture which he feels is almost as civilized as our own. This is the little-known society of Snarfs (or--to give them their original German spelling, Schnarffes). There are some seventy-five thousand of these Snarfs living in small cities, towns, and villages in the inaccessible Grool, a mountain plateau which was, until the development of the long-range helicopter, entirely cut off from the world.

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