Hail to Thee, Okoboji U! A Humor Anthology on Higher Education

By Mark C. Ebersole | Go to book overview

Alumni News

Andrew Ward


1899

Chester Wheatlock and his wife, Grace Darling Bayberry ('03), have been permitted adjoining rooms at the Benign Overlook Extended Care Facility in Dill, North Dakota, following Mr. Wheatlock's retirement from just about everything. "Don't worry about me," pens Chester. "I am fine. Go on and take care of the others, as I am fine."


1920

May Day Frondflusk was removed from her mission in Hua, South Vietnam, where she had labored on behalf of Hua's needy for close to forty years. "Miss Flondfrusk," as she was affectionately known by the natives, had to be forcibly transported by members of the fleeing South Vietnamese army. As head of the Hua Free-Through-Christ Alien Culture Mission, May established the town's first school of palmistry, a home for stray animals, a recording studio, and a chain of short-order restaurants. Miss Frondflusk has accepted an offer to work on behalf of a new Operation Bootstrap project in Shreveport, Louisiana. "But it won't be the same," May laments. "They tax you to death in Shreveport."


1934

Can anyone help Carter Patapsco? Carter has moved to his retirement cottage in Bay Ledge, Connecticut, where he has taken up bird-watching. "Before I began to read up on the subject, bird calls were cheerful voices from the wilds, as mysterious and variegated as snowflakes. But now, after a reading of Peterson Field Guide, an afternoon on the terrace is for me like an eternity in the company of lunatics. 'Cheedle chee

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