The only real rest seemed to be when he was out of the house.

He went downstairs in his shirt and then struggled into his pit- trousers, which were left on the hearth to warm all night. There was always a fire, because Mrs. Morel raked. And the first sound in the house was the bang, bang of the poker against the raker, as Morel smashed the remainder of the coal to make the kettle, which was filled and left on the hob, finally boil. His cup and knife and fork, all he wanted except just the food, was laid ready on the table on a newspaper. Then he got his breakfast, made the tea, packed the bottom of the doors with rags to shut out the draught, piled a big fire, and sat down to an hour of joy. He toasted his bacon on a fork and caught the drops of fat on his bread; then he put the rasher on his thick slice of bread, and cut off chunks with a clasp-knife, poured his tea into his saucer, and was happy. With his family about, meals were never so pleasant. He loathed a fork: it is a modern introduction which has still scarcely reached common people. What Morel preferred was a clasp-knife. Then, in solitude, he ate and drank, often sitting, in cold weather, on a little stool with his back to the warm chimney-piece, his food on the fender, his cup on the hearth. And then he read the last night's newspaper-what of it he could-spelling it over laboriously. He preferred to keep the blinds down and the candle lit even when it was daylight; it was the habit of the mine.

At a quarter to six he rose, cut two thick slices of bread and butter, and put them in the white calico snap-bag. He filled his tin bottle with tea. Cold tea without milk or sugar was the drink he preferred for the pit. Then he pulled off his shirt, and put on his pit-singlet, a vest of thick flannel cut low round the neck, and with short sleeves like a chemise.

Then he went upstairs to his wife with a cup of tea because she was ill, and because it occurred to him.

"I've brought thee a cup o' tea, lass," he said.

"Well, you needn't, for you know I don't like it," she replied.

"Drink it up; it'll pop thee off to sleep again."

She accepted the tea. It pleased him to see her take it and sip it.

"I'll back my life there's no sugar in," she said.

"Yi--there's one big 'in," he replied, injured.

"It's a wonder," she said, sipping again.

-30-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter I - The Early Married Life of the Morels 3
  • Chapter II - The Birth of Paul, and Another Battle 30
  • Chapter III - The Casting off of Morel-- the Taking on of William 49
  • Chapter IV - The Young Life of Paul 61
  • Chapter V - Paul Launches into Life 88
  • Chapter VI - Death in the Family 119
  • Part Two 149
  • Chapter VII - Lad-And-Girl Love 151
  • Chapter VIII - Strife in Love 190
  • Chapter IX - Defeat of Miriam 227
  • Chapter X - Clara 265
  • Chapter XI - The Test on Miriam 291
  • Chapter XII - Passion 314
  • Chapter XIII - Baxter Dawes 355
  • Chapter XIV - The Release 394
  • Chapter XV - Derelict 426
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