Following the Equator: A Journey around the World - Vol. 2

By Mark Twain | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X

If the desire to kill and the opportunity to kill came always together, who would escape hanging?-- Pudd'nhead Wilson New Calendar.

ON the Train. Fifty years ago, when I was a boy in the then remote and sparsely peopled Mississippi valley, vague tales and rumors of a mysterious body of professional murderers came wandering in from a country which was constructively as far from us as the constellations blinking in space--India; vague tales and rumors of a sect called Thugs, who waylaid travelers in lonely places and killed them for the contentment of a god whom they worshiped; tales which everybody liked to listen to and nobody believed--except with reservations. It was considered that the stories had gathered bulk on their travels. The matter died down and a lull followed. Then Eugène Sue, Wandering Jew appeared, and made great talk for a while. One character in it was a chief of Thugs--Feringhea--a mysterious and terrible Indian who was as slippery and sly as a serpent, and as deadly; and he stirred up the Thug interest once more. But it did not last. It presently died again--this time to stay dead.

At first glance it seems strange that this should have happened; but really it was not strange--on the contrary, it was natural; I mean on our side of

-98-

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Following the Equator: A Journey around the World - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Following the Equator 1
  • Chapter II 13
  • Chapter V 48
  • Chapter VI 57
  • Chapter VII 64
  • Chapter IX 84
  • Chapter X 98
  • Chapter XI 112
  • Chapter XII 125
  • Chapter XIII 137
  • Chapter XIV 153
  • Chapter XVI 173
  • Chapter XVII 185
  • Chapter XX 215
  • Chapter XXI 223
  • Chapter XXII 230
  • Chapter XXIV 261
  • Chapter XXV 273
  • Chapter XVII 285
  • Chapter XXVII 297
  • Chapter XXVIII 306
  • Chapter XXIX 318
  • Chapter XXX 327
  • Chapter XXXI 338
  • Chapter XXXII 354
  • Chapter XXXIII 366
  • Conclusion 379
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