Criteria for Retirement: A Report of a National Conference on Retirement of Older Workers Held at Arden House, Harriman Campus of Columbia University, January 24-26, 1952

By Geneva A. Mathiasen | Go to book overview
Save to active project

or retired, he has the same needs for physical and emotional security--for adequate food, clothing, and shelter, for affection, appreciation, understanding, and the realization that he is needed and wanted in the world. When this fact is kept in mind, the mental health difficulties of the older worker are seen to arise not so much from whether or not he is employed as from his urgent impulse to satisfy these needs. The difficulties then may be seen to be associated with retirement but actually adventitious to it. When these needs are satisfied, retirement is not only acceptable but may be the source of much positive enjoyment.


Conclusion

Quite aside from the relationship which the working environment bears to health and disease in the worker, there is a profound effect of that environment upon him which arises from the fact that it is so largely mechanized. In the past the mechanization process has appeared to be a handicap to aging workers because it has put a premium on speed combined with alertness and precision which seemed to penalize the worker who was growing old. The need to make allowances for the slowing up in reaction time with age has not seemed compatible with the operation of mechanical processes whose essential nature forbade the individualization of any factor, including that of time.

Many mechanized processes are essentially repetitive and neither require nor permit the addition of the operator's judgment or skill --qualities which are the assets of age. On the other hand, the operation of some kinds of modern machines requires the ability to interpret complicated data and the capacity to make prompt decisions based on those data, thus placing a heavy responsibility on the operator--responsibility of a type which the older worker may find it hard to assume or carry. Displacement of the older worker has thus seemed to be a natural and inevitable concomitant of the mechanization of industry.

There are, nevertheless, ways in which mechanization may be seen to be a help to the aging. The replacement of muscle power by machine power opens the way for the employment of older people

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Criteria for Retirement: A Report of a National Conference on Retirement of Older Workers Held at Arden House, Harriman Campus of Columbia University, January 24-26, 1952
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 233

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?