Sir Thomas Browne: A Man of Achievement in Literature

Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
'THE GARDEN OF CYRUS'

IF we accept Sir Geoffrey Keynes's suggested dating, The Garden of Cyrus was the last work that Sir Thomas Browne prepared for the press. He had no obvious reason for writing books for publication; his life was full and busy, he was practising medicine, he was head of a large family, he was busy with experiments and he was an omnivorous reader. He was certainly not driven to write by excess of leisure, nor, I think, by ambition; he enjoyed writing, he was addicted to it. Jotting down his thoughts in notebooks did not always satisfy his craving; he needed to weave some of those notes into compositions, or ordered sequacious reflections. It would seem that, a year or more after completing Urne-Buriall, his notebooks and his meditations suggested the new theme. In his dedicatory letter: 'To my Worthy and Honoured friend, Nicholas Bacon', he apologizes for writing about gardens, being himself no gardener; he explains that he is not writing a 'Herball', for of these there are already enough and Sir Nicholas is familiar with them; he is not expecting to add to knowledge about botany; he is merely seeking a field of inquiry that has not already been fully cropped; he says to his learned friend:

You have been so long out of trite learning, that 'tis hard to finde a subject proper for you; and if you have met with a Sheet upon this, we have missed our intention. In this multiplicity of writing, bye and barren Themes are best fitted for invention; Subjects so often discoursed confine the Imagination, and fixe our conceptions unto the notions of fore-writers. Beside, such Discourses allow excursions, and venially admit of collaterall truths, though at some distance from their principals. Wherein if we sometimes take wide liberty, we are not single, but erre by great example.1

____________________
1
Browne marginal note reads: 'Hippocrates, De superfœtatione, de dentitione.'

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sir Thomas Browne: A Man of Achievement in Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Chapter I The Life of Sir Thomas Browne 1
  • Chapter II Domestic Correspondence 25
  • Chapter III 'Religio Medici' (part I) 53
  • Chapter IV 'Religio Medici' (part Ii) 98
  • Chapter V 'Pseudodoxia' (book I) 125
  • Chapter VI 'Pseudodoxia' (books Ii-Vii) 158
  • Chapter VII 'Hydriotaphia, Urne-Buriall' 188
  • Chapter VIII 'the Garden of Cyrus' 205
  • Chapter IX Posthumous Works 220
  • Index 251
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 255

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.