Revolt in the Arts: A Survey of the Creation, Distribution and Appreciation of Art in America

By Oliver M. Sayler | Go to book overview

REVOLT IN THE ARTS
A SURVEY OF THE CREATION, DISTRIBUTION AND APPRECIATION OF ART IN AMERICA

BY OLIVER M. SAYLER

With Contributions by Thirty-six Representative Authorities in the Several Arts

BRENTANO'S PUBLISHERS NEW YORK

-iii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Revolt in the Arts: A Survey of the Creation, Distribution and Appreciation of Art in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Part One 1
  • 1- The Fact of Revolt 3
  • II- The Nature of Revolt 14
  • III- The Extent of Revolt 40
  • IV- The Causes of Revolt 49
  • V- The Implications of Revolt 55
  • Part Two- A Field Survey 173
  • Training the Playwright of the Machine Age 175
  • Some Notes on the Playwright in Revolt 180
  • The Eternal Theatre 185
  • The Theatre--Art and Instinct 187
  • The Actor as Artist 191
  • The Wasted Gifts of the Scene Designer 197
  • The Light Musical Stage at the Cross Roads 202
  • Suggesting a Dramatic Declaration of Independence 205
  • The Repertory Theatre 210
  • Art on a Manufacturing Basis 215
  • Sound Stimulates Story 222
  • On Behalf of the Silent Film 225
  • Directing Sound Pictures 231
  • The Player in the Films 234
  • The Cinema Designer Confronts Sound 241
  • Nature, Teacher of the Dance 245
  • Seeking an American Art of the Dance 249
  • Toward an American Ballet 256
  • New Ideas in Music Education 259
  • The Composer in the Machine Age 264
  • Opera and the Symphony Will Survive 270
  • The Challenge of Mechanical Music to the Powers of the Young Artist 276
  • Radio as an Independent Art 280
  • A New Art in Birth-Throes 284
  • The Novel in Transition 288
  • Modern Poetry 294
  • The New Biography 299
  • Speed and the Essayist 304
  • The Newspaper as Literature 308
  • Of the Making of Books 310
  • Learning by Working on the Job 314
  • Art Is, Was, and Ever Will Be 318
  • The Sculptor Waits on the Architect 322
  • Architecture--"In Between" 327
  • Form and Color in the Home 330
  • The Challenge of Industrial Design 334
  • The Contributors 337
  • Index 343
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.