The Anthropology of Medicine: From Culture to Method

By Lola Romanucci-Ross; Daniel E. Moerman et al. | Go to book overview

phor, finding it appropriate to view information from various disciplines as capital. Different systems of information translated into "symbolic capital" can lead us to better appreciate the relationship between things or objects, and those persons (agents) shaped by their culture. We shape and define the nature of those knowledge domains which we revere as reality and therefore, with our consent, they rule the imagination. We have alluded to an example in the rhetorical devices of physicists to exemplify what is characteristic of many established scientific disciplines -- an intention-based semantics. The reader is driven to ascribe meaning, but the road to meaning is carefully guided by the intent of the scientist-authors, an intent to convert the reader to a belief system. This is done through a subtle shift from words conveying thoughts to words presumably conveying things: "facts," causes, relationships ( Grice 1989). Nor do we think that anthropology as a discipline is free of intentional works and pronouncements. Many anthropologists have thought of culture as the ultimate explanation, which raises the interesting question of where one could stand outside of it or find a lever long enough to arrange cultural words into meaningful constellations that are also dependable maps.

Medical anthropology has indeed enriched both anthropology and medicine, and will undoubtedly continue to do so. It is also a promising area for research in those knowledge domains composing the field; these are the domains that can be restructured into a new semantic field, a new grammar for avoiding the old paradigms of either/or. We need not look to biology or culture for the unique, "real," and exclusive cause for any of the phenomena we study. Biological events are biocultural; cultural events are also biological. Biological events and cultural events are equally and simultaneously biocultural. The materials we need to reach a new level of discourse are in our grasp; we have only to abandon outmoded approaches/disciplines to achieve an enlightening beginning for a new science.


REFERENCES

Baxter L. R., M. E. Phelps, J. B. Mazziotta, B. H. Guze, J. M. Schwartz, and C. E. Selin . 1987. "Local Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rates in Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder: A Comparison with Rates in Unipolar Depression and in Normal Controls". Archives of General Psychiatry 44:211-18.

Bohr N. 1958. Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge. New York: John Wiley and Sons.

Bourdieu Pierre. 1977. Outline of a Theory of Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chandler J. H., T. E. Reed, and R. N. Dejong. 1960. Huntington's Chorea in Michigan . Neurology 10:148-53.

Conneally P. M. 1984. "Huntington Disease: Genetics and Epidemiology". American Journal of Human Genetics 36:506-29.

Connor J. F., and M. A. Ferguson-Smith. 1987. Essential Medical Genetics, 2nd ed. St. Louis, Mo.: Blackball Scientific Publications.

-379-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Anthropology of Medicine: From Culture to Method
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 400

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.