Teaching and Technology: The Impact of Unlimited Information Access on Classroom Teaching: Proceedings of a National Forum at Earlham College

By Evan Ira Farber; Forum on Teaching and Technology | Go to book overview

HOW TEACHERS TEACH, HOW STUDENTS LEARN: CREATING INTELLECTUAL TRAMPOLINES

FRED GOODMAN

Here are seven names that should be easy to remember based on what Wilbert McKeachie has said. (If you remember each name and why I included it, I'm doing well): Shoshana Zuboff, Jacob Bronowski, Ivan Illich, Norbert Wiener, Suzanne Langer, Frithjof Bergmann and Mohamar Kadafi.

In the age of the smart machine Shoshana Zuboff suggests that we need a word, something other than "automate," to describe this round of technological revolution. We not only "automate," we "informate" this time around. We inform the person who is using the machine tool, information is added as a result of employing technology. But here I should do a little bit of myth-bashing. The myth is that technology is a laborsaving device. Not in education. It is not a laborsaving device. There is nothing we are talking about here that's a laborsaving device.

Your work is going to be much, much harder as a result of the technology that surrounds you. I use the notion of informating with respect to the CONFER computer conferences that I require of my students. I am a voyeur in terms of what they are saying about my lectures. I know from my work in technology that it's very easy to imagine the technology that extends and amplifies the work of my mouth. I know it's very hard to use technology to enhance my ears -- it's very hard for me to extend the number of conversations

Goodman is Professor of Education, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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