Building the Text: Architecture as Metaphor in Late Medieval and Early Modern France

By David Grant Cowling | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
A Checklist of Architectural Allegories of the Period 1460-1540
Note: references in bold are to fuller discussions, numbered by chapter. Other references are to footnotes, numbered by chapter. Brief notes are provided on those allegories that are not discussed at length in the study.
1457
René d'Anjou, Le Livre du cuer d'amours espris [5]. The narrator follows an allegorical itinerary on his quest for the favours of his lady Mercy, visiting the Ospital d'Amours (pp. 115-54) with its cemetery of lovers (pp. 120-47) and the Chastel de Plaisance, home of the God of Love, whose fabric of precious stones is described at some length in terms similar to the castle conquered by the Beau Doulx (pp. 158-9; 167; 174-5). For a synopsis of the plot, see Robert Deschaux, Observations sur Le Livre du cuer d'amours espris, roman de l'aventure d'aimer, in Jean-Claude Aubailly et al. (eds.), "Et c'est la fin pour quoy sommes ensemble": Hommage à jean Dufournet, 3 vols, ( Paris: Champion, 1993), i. 419-25 (420-1).

1459-61
Les Cent Nouvelles nouvelles,29 [1].

1461
Jean Meschinot, Les Lunettes des princes [1461-5; 4].
Antoine de La Sale, La Sale [4].
George Chastelain, Déprécation pour Messire Pierre de Brézé [3].

1463
George Chastelain and Jean Robertet, Les Douze Dames de Rhétorique [5].

1464
George Chastelain, Le Temple de Bocace [5].

1466
Pierre Michault, Le Doctrinal du temps présent [4]. The text presents a visit to and description of the antithetical schools of Faulceté and Vertu. The first is subterranean, staffed by vices, and full of students, the second is an imperishable structure built on a circular plan, staffed by the Cardinal Virtues, and empty.

-217-

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