Off the Record with F. D. R., 1942-1945

By William D. Hassett | Go to book overview

1942:

On the way home from the White House this afternoon, stopped at Hausler's in Seventeenth Street and picked up this book in which to jot down a few notes of a unique trip to Hyde Park with the President, to be undertaken tonight.

W. D. H., January 6, 1942

January 6, Tuesday. Left with the President tonight at 11 o'clock by B & O, from Silver Spring, on a strictly off-the-record trip to Hyde Park, the first blackout trip. The President directed that strict secrecy be kept concerning this trip, not even the press being informed of his plans or permitted to accompany us.

Learned of plans for the departure about 5:30 P.M., went home, packed, and returned to the White House, which we left about 10:30 for Silver Spring. With the President were Harry Hopkins and Grace Tully.* I rode with the Secret Service men in the car immediately behind the President's. We went out Sixteenth Street to Silver Spring--a bitter cold night with sharp wind, not very cozy in an open car. Our party was not recognized as we made our way through traffic congested in spots.

____________________
*
Hopkins, the intimate associate and adviser of President Roosevelt, was then living at the White House and had been present at the daily talks between the President and Prime Minister Churchill, who the day before had left for a vacation in Florida at the villa of Edward R. Stettinius near Palm Beach.

Miss Tully, having first been Mrs. Roosevelt's secretary, was with the family throughout the Albany years. She went to the White House with F. D. R. in 1933 and had been his private secretary since 1941. She succeeded to the position following a disabling illness to Marguerite ("Missy") LeHand, whose assistant she had been, and remained with the President until his death. Afterward she became Executive Secretary of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial Foundation. She is often referred to by the diarist as the "Lady Abbess."

-1-

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Off the Record with F. D. R., 1942-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Introduction vii
  • 1942: 1
  • 1943: 150
  • 1944: 228
  • 1945: 309
  • Index 349
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