Off the Record with F. D. R., 1942-1945

By William D. Hassett | Go to book overview

1944:

[In his State of the Union Message of January 11, the President cautioned the nation against complacency and self-seeking special interests. He called for passage of a national service act, and asked Congress to explore ways of implementing an "economic bill of rights" to improve the living standard of Americans.]

January 21, Friday. The President full of stories when we had lemonade with him tonight as the train pulled out for Hyde Park. Recalled the good food that used to be served in Young's Hotel, Boston. Reminisced on the effect it had on his old Scotch nurse when the family stopped at Young's on the way to Campobello and the nurse discovered that unwittingly she had eaten frog's legs; ditto on one of his Norwegian royal guests who ate canned rattlesnake meat as an hors d'oeuvre. Painful reactions of others to the knowledge they had eaten snails. More yarns about the Vanderbilts--the confidence the old Commodore had in his mother's judgment. In the best of spirits--looking pretty well after his siege with flu, happy in the prospect of a week's rest at home. Both Grace Tully and Dorothy Brady on this trip and will stay at the Hyde Park house.

Remarked on bow ill Harry Hopkins looked in the picture carried in afternoon papers. Harry left the Naval Hospital at Bethesda today to tell a Federal grand jury that the famous "Hopkins" letter purporting to involve him with Wendell Willkie's presidential ambitions is a forgery--a new low even in dirty politics.

The President had a full day despite cancellation of his morning press conference. Met with his Cabinet in the afternoon. His visitors included Charles E. Wilson, former president of General Electric, now executive vice chairman of the War Production

-228-

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Off the Record with F. D. R., 1942-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Introduction vii
  • 1942: 1
  • 1943: 150
  • 1944: 228
  • 1945: 309
  • Index 349
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