Complete Poetry and Selected Prose

By John Hayward; John Donne | Go to book overview

NOTES

"It is the Text that saves us; the interlineary glosses, and the marginal notes, and the variæ lectiones, controversies and perplexities, undo us." [ XXVI Sermons, 4, p. 47.]

THE textual and explanatory notes which appear in the following pages are very far from being exhaustive. They do not, in any sense, form an apparatus criticus to Donne's writings. To do so, another volume of equal size would be necessary, and its contents would consist very largely of repetitions of annotations made by previous editors. I have confined myself therefore to points which hitherto have received little attention, and to important variant readings, those, in particular, which I have adopted in preference to the choice of other editors. The notes to the poems acknowledge in many cases the help I have received from Professor Grierson's edition. It has been impossible, in so limited a space, to indicate the sources of emendations selected from MSS. and printed editions where the original text is corrupt. For the punctuation of the poems I have received many suggestions from Professor Grierson's edition, with whose standards I usually agree. At the same time I have endeavoured to preserve as far as possible the original punctuation except where it is definitely misleading. New light has been thrown on Elizabethan punctuation in recent years by Mr. Percy Simpson; and Mrs. Simpson ( Rev. Eng. Studies, IV, 15, July, 1928) has shown that Donne himself was aware of its importance. The punctuation of the Sermons, which Donne prepared for the press, was obviously intentional.
POEMS

SONGS AND SONETS
p. 3, l. 17. The Good-morrow. The MSS. and editions are divided over the choice of the epithet for hemispheares. 'better' is the reading of 1633 and some of the best MSS. 'fitter' the reading of the later editions and the majority of MSS. Probably Donne himself was uncertain which to use. After much consideration I have adopted 'better', which seems to express the idea which he had in mind.
p. 6, l. 10. The Sunne Rising: "which are the rags of time." Cf. LXXX Sermons, II, 12-13.

-761-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Complete Poetry and Selected Prose
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 798

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.