Turning Wood into Art: The Jane and Arthur Mason Collection

By Suzanne Ramljak; Michael W. Monroe et al. | Go to book overview
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Notes

Notes to Chapter 1
1.
Robert Hobbs, Mark Lindquist: Revolutions in Wood ( Richmond, VA: Hand Workshop Art Center, 1995), 10.

Notes to Chapter 2
1.
For the concept of the museum as people's palace, see Nathaniel Burt, Palaces for the People: A social History of the American Art Museum ( Boston: Little Brown, 1977).
2.
The relationship between royal turning and cosmology; was developed by Dr. Mogens Bencard, Director of Danish Royal Collections, in his paper "Royal Turning: Objects Turned by Members of the Danish Royal Family, 1600-1800," delivered at the American Craft Museum, January 29, 1998. See also Gésa von Habsburg, Princely Treasures ( New York: The Vendome Press, 1997).
3.
Notable in this regard is Tran Turner , et al., Expressions in Wood: Masterworks from the Wornick Collection ( Oakland, CA: The Oakland Museum of California, 1996).
4.
Among the few artists in the wood- turning field who have been the subject of a monograph are Mark Lindquist, Rude Osolnik, and James Prestini.
5.
Edward S. Cooke, "Turning Wood in America: New Perspectives on the Lathe," in Turner, et al., Expressions in Wood, 39.
6.
Cited in Alfred H. Barr, et al., Weimar Bauhaus 1919-1925 ( New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1938), 27. Prestini's involvement with Bauhaus principles was likely reinforced when the New Bauhaus was based in Chicago from 1937 to 1946, a period that corresponded with Prestini teaching at Chicago's Institute of Design at Illinois Institute of Technology, from 1939 to 1946.
7.
Robert Hobbs, Mark Lindquist: Revolutions in Wood ( Richmond, VA: Hand Workshop Art Center, 1995), 10.
8.
Ceramic historian Garth Clark, among others, has openly lamented this worship of the handmade in crafts, stating, "If we [the craft fields] are going to grow then there cannot be a role that says if you don't believe in the handmade you are a heathen." Interview with the author, June 23, 1998.
9.
Duchamp's ready-made Fountain ( 1917) was a urinal turned upside down and signed R. Mutt, perhaps a reference to the comic-strip characters Mutt and Jeff or to the then-prominent manufacturer of bathroom fixtures, Richard Mott.
10.
Pierre Cabanne, Dialogues with Marcel Duchamp ( New York: Viking Press, 1971), 80.
11.
Ibid., 16.
12.
John Ruskin, The Lamp of Beauty: Writings on Art ( London: Phaidon Press, 1995), 265-66.
13.
Ibid., 266.
14.
Cited in Albert LeCoff, Lathe- Turned Objects: An International Exhibition ( Philadelphia: The Wood Turning Center, 1988), 149.
15.
Ibid., 147.
16.
Ibid., 42.
17.
John Perreault, "Turned On: Toward an Esthetic of the Turned- Wood Vessel," in Turner, et al., Expressions in Wood, 36.
18.
Cited in Stephen Hogbin, et al., Curators' Focus. Turning in Context ( Philadelphia: The Wood Turning Center, 1997), 112.
19.
LeCoff, 146.
20.
Oscar Wilde, "The Decay of Lying," The Complete Works of Oscar Wilde ( New York: Harper & Row, 1989), 978.
21.
For the role of chance in post- World War II American art, see, among others, Helen Westgeest, Zen in the Fifties: Interaction in Art Between East and West ( Amsterdam: Waanders, 1997).
22.
Cabanne, 46
23.
LeCoff, 145.
24.
Cited in Edward Jacobson, et al., The Art of Turner-Wood Bowls ( New York: E. P. Dutton, 1985), 32.
25.
Ruth Greenberg, unpublished artist's statement.
26.
Turner, et al., 120.
27.
The International Turning Exchange program at Philadelphia's Wood Turning Center is designed to foster collaboration between participants and has resulted in several collaborative partnerships, including the long-standing union of Todd Hover and Havley Smith, who were residents in 1985.
28.
James Hillman, "Plural Art," in Hillman, et al., Team Spirit ( New York: Independent Curators Incorporated, 1991), 60.
29.
Ibid., 61.
30.
Ibid., 63.
31.
Cited in Hobbs, 13.
32.
Quoted in "Passion and Reason Reconciled," Michelle Holzapfel ( New York: Peter Joseph Gallery, 1991), unpaginated exhibition catalogue.
33.
Among the artists who openly recognize Barbara Hepworth and other early organic modernist sculptors as an inspiration are Michelle Holzapfel, Robyn Horn, Stoney Lamar, Mark Lindquist, and Jack Slentz.
34.
From David Nash, Wood Primer ( San Francisco: Bedford Press, 1987). Cited in Collection Extra: Three Forms-Three Cuts ( Omaha, NE: Joslyn Museum of Art, 1995).
35.
Michael Perlman, The Power of Trees: The Reforesting of the Soul ( Dallas: Spring Publications, 1994), 4.
36.
Andreas Feininger, The Tree ( New York: Rizzoli, 1991), 7.
37.
John Fowles, The Tree ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1979), unpaginated.
38.
Ibid.
39.
Wilde, 986.
40.
E. T. Cook and Alexander Wedderburn , eds. The Works of John Ruskin ( London: George Allen, 1904), vol. 5, 333.
41.
Quoted in LeCoff, 145.
42.
Cited in Gaston Bachelard, "The Poetics of Space" ( Boston: Beacon Press, 1969), 232.
43.
Stephen Hogbin, "Turning Full Circle," Fine Woodworking no. 21 (March/ April 1980): 56.
44.
Quoted in LeCoff, 148.
45.
Ibid., 144. Also cited in Hogbin, et al., Curators' Focus, 97.
46.
Loren Madsen, Statistical Ahstract: Pipes. 1998. This work consists of two turned poplar columns; the small pipe represents (from bottom to top) the share of the United States aggregate income received by the middle 20 percent of families from 1970 to 1995, and the large pipe represents (from bottom to top) the share of the United States aggregate income received by the top 5 percent of families from 1970 to 1995.
47.
Rudolph Arnheim, The Split and the Structure, Twenty-Eight Essays ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996), 16.
48.
Arnheim, The Power of the Center: A Study of Composition in the Visual Arts ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1982), vii.
49.
James Elkins, The Object Stares Back, On the Nature of Seeing ( New York: Harcourt, Brace & Company, 1996), 125.
50.
Ibid., 128.
51.
Ibid., 129.
52.
Edmund Sinnott, The Problem of Organic Form ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1961), 6-7.
53.
M. C. Richards, Centering: In Pottery, Poetry and the Person ( Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1989), 15.
54.
Herbert Read, The Origins of Form in Art ( New York: Horizon Press, 1961).
55.
Jack Burnham, Beyond Modern Sculpture ( New York: George Braziller, 1968), 100. Burnham made this observation in relation to the views of zoologist D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson as expressed in his book On Growth and Form ( Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1959).
56.
Siegfried Giedion, Mechanization Takes Command, A Contribution to Anonymous History ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1948), 3.
57.
Ibid., 721.
58.
Masterworks ( New York: Peter Joseph Gallery, 1991), 28.
59.
Bachelard, 234.
60.
Richards, 6.
61.
For more on mandalas see José and Miriam Argüelles, Mandala ( Boston and London: Shambhala, 1985); and Denise Patry Leidy, Mandala: The Architecture of Enlightenment ( New York: Asia Society Galleries, 1997).

Notes to Chapter 3
1.
Arthur Warren Schultz, In Praise of A merica's Collectors ( Santa Barbara, CA: Santa Barbara Art Museum, 1977), 41.
2.
Heather Sealy Lineberry, Turned Wood Now: Redefining the Lathe- Turned Object IV ( Tempe, AZ: Arizona State University Art Museum, 1977), 10.
3.
Robert Smithson, American Sculpture of the Sixties, Maurice Tuchnian , ed. ( Los Angeles, CA: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1967), 10.
4.
Michelle Holzapfel, "Reflections of a Perpetual Student," Turning Points 10, no. 1 (spring 1977): 18.
5.
Virginia Dotson, quoted in Out of the Woods: Turned Wood by American Craftsmen ( Mobile, AL.: The Fine Arts Museum of the South, 1992), 26.
6.
David Ellsworth, from a grant application submitted to the PEW Fellowships in the Art, The University of the Arts ( Philadelphia, PA, June 1999).
7.
Herbert Read, A Concise History of Modern Sculpture ( New York: Frederick A. Praeger, Inc., 1964), 80.
8.
David McFadden, quoted in The New York Times March 7, 1999, 46.
9.
Ibid.
10.
Dale L. Nish, quoted in Edward Jacobson , The Art of Turned-Wood Bowls ( New York: E. P. Dutton, Inc., 1985), 10.
11.
David Ellsworth, quoted in Turning Points 6, no. 2 (summer/fall, 1993), 3.
12.
Bob Stocksdale, quoted in Out of the Woods, 72.
13.
Ibid.
14.
Jane Kessler, "A Great Deal of Depth: A Portrait of Rude Osolnik," American Woodturner ( December 1994.): 22.
15.
Ed Moulthrop, quoted in Jacobson, 53.
16.
Ron Kent, quoted in Hogbin, et al. Curators' Focus: Turning in Context ( Philadelphia, Pa: Wood Turning Center, Inc., 1997), 90.
17.
William Hunter, quoted in ibid., 37.
18.
Read, The Origins of form in Art ( New York: Horizon Press, 1965), 177-78.
19.
David Ellsworth, from a grant application submitted to the PEW Fellowships in the Arts.
20.
Michael Peterson, quoted in Alan DuBois , Moving Beyond Tradition: A Turned-Wood Invitational ( Little Rock, AR: The Arkansas Arts Center Decorative Arts Museum, 1997), 48.
21.
Michael Peterson, quoted in Out of the Wood, 64.
22.
Alan Stirt, quoted in Curators' Focus. 142.
23.
Po Shun Leong, quoted Tony Lydgate , Po Shun Leong: Art Bores ( New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., 1998), 9.
24.
Quoted in Read, A Concise History of modern Sculpture, 14.
25.
Garth Clark, American Ceramics: 1876 to the Present ( New York: Abbeville Press, 1979), 102.
26.
Rose Slivka, Peter Voulkos: A Dialoque? with Clay ( New York: New York Graphic Society in association with American Craft Council, 1978), book jacket flap.
27.
Robert Hobbs, Mark Lindquist: Revolutions in Wood ( Richmond, VA: Hand Workshop Art Center, 1995), 22.
28.
Stoney Lamar, quoted in DuBois, 34.
29.
Richard Hooper, quoted in Curators' Focus, 82.
30.
Turning Points 6, no. 2 (summer/fall 1993), 3.

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