Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Understanding Rock: Essays in Musical Analysis

By John Covach; Graeme M. Boone | Go to book overview

3
Blues Transformation in
the Music of Cream

DAVE HEADLAM

In 1966, guitarist Eric Clapton joined with bass player Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker to form the rock trio Cream. While Clapton tended toward a style of electric blues close to the Mississippi Delta and Chicago blues songs he venerated, with the combination of Bruce's elaborate bass lines and Baker's jazz-influenced drumming Cream quickly became the best known of the original "power trio" blues-based rock bands and prepared the ground for the later group Led Zeppelin to begin the transition from blues-based rock to heavy metal. Cream's assimilation and transformation of blues songs and styles is part of the widespread influence of American popular music--jazz, blues, rhythm and blues, and rock 'n' roll -- on the development of British rock music in the late 1950s and 1960s. While this influence has been well documented in its biographical, historical, cultural, and sociological aspects, the purely musical features of the various transformations, such as Cream's recasting of blues songs into rock songs, have received less attention. 1 However, in view of the reception of rock music by audiences who knew little of its background or context but responded primarily to the music itself -- the rhythm, volume, and timbres -- it is clear that these features deserve serious consideration. In this article I will focus on some musical aspects of Cream's adaptations of blues songs into rock and also comment on some of the band's original but blues-based compositions. The conclusion outlines some of the problems inherent in a such a music-analytical approach and suggests some avenues for further study.

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Rock: Essays in Musical Analysis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 219

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.