Court Masques: Jacobean and Caroline Entertainments, 1605-1640

By David Lindley | Go to book overview

BEN JONSON


The Masque of Queens

The Masque of Queens

Celebrated from the House of Fame.

By the most absolute in all state and titles:

Anne

Queen of Great Britain, etc.,

With her honourable ladies at Whitehall,

Feb. 2, 1609

It increasing now to the third time˚ of my being used in these services
to her majesty's personal presentations, with the ladies whom she pleaseth to honour, it was my first and special regard to see that the
nobility of the invention should be answerable to the dignity of their

persons. For which reason I chose the argument to be a celebration 5
of honourable and true fame, bred out of virtue; observing that rule
of the best artist,˚ to suffer no object of delight to pass without his
mixture of profit and example.

And because her Majesty, best knowing that a principal part of life

in these spectacles lay in their variety, had commanded me to think 10
on some dance or show that might precede hers, and have the place
of a foil or false masque, I was careful to decline,˚ not only from
others', but mine own steps in that kind, since the last year I had an
antimasque of boys;˚ and therefore now devised that twelve women
in the habit of hags or witches, sustaining the persons of Ignorance, 15
Suspicion, Credulity, etc., the opposites to good Fame, should fill that
part, not as a masque but a spectacle of strangeness, producing
multiplicity of gesture, and not unaptly sorting with the current and
whole fall of the device.

His Majesty then being set, and the whole company in full expectation, 20
that which presented itself was an ugly hell, which, flaming beneath,
smoked unto the top of the roof. And in respect all evils are, morally, said
to come from hell (as also from that observation of Torrentius upon Horace
his Canidia
, quae tot instructa venenis, ex Orci faucibus profecta
videri possit˚)these witches, with a kind of hollow and infernal music, 25

came forth from thence. First one, then two, and three, and more, till their
number increased to eleven;˚ all differently attired, some with rats en their

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Court Masques: Jacobean and Caroline Entertainments, 1605-1640
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.