Court Masques: Jacobean and Caroline Entertainments, 1605-1640

By David Lindley | Go to book overview

SAMUEL DANIEL


Tethys' Festival

Tethys' Festival

or

The Queen's Wake˚

Celebrated at Whitehall, the fifth day of June 1610


The Preface to the Reader

For so much as shows and spectacles of this nature are usually
registered among the memorable acts of the time, being complements
of state, both to show magnificence˚ and to celebrate the feasts to our
greatest respects, it is expected (according now to the custom) that I,

being employed in the business, should publish a description and 5
form of the late masque, wherewithal it pleased the Queen's most
excellent majesty to solemnize the creation of the high and mighty
Prince Henry, Prince of Wales, in regard to˚ preserve the memory
thereof, and to satisfy their desires who could have no other notice
but by others' report of what was done. Which I do not out of a desire 10
to be seen in pamphlets, or of forwardness to show my invention
therein; for I thank God, I labour not with that disease of ostentation,
nor affect to be known to be the man digitoque monstrarier, hic est,˚
having my name already wider in this kind than I desire, and more
in the wind than I would. Neither do I seek in the divulging hereof 15
to give it other colours than those it wore, or to make an Apology of
what I have done; knowing, howsoever, it must pass the way of
censure, whereunto I see all publications, of what nature soever, are
liable. And my long experience of the world hath taught me this: that
never remonstrances nor apologies could ever get over the stream of 20
opinion to do good on the other side, where contrary affection and
conceit had to do,˚ but only served to entertain their own partialness
who were fore-persuaded, and so was a labour in vain. And it is
oftentimes an argument of pusillanimity and may make ut iudicium
nostrum, metus videatur,˚ and render a good cause suspected by too 25

much labouring to defend it, which might be the reason that some of
the late greatest princes of Christendom would never have their

-54-

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