Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

and which I know reflects the needs of the State and the welfare of its people. That message is this. The time has come and the hour has struck which demand that our conflicting views be reconciled into legislative action.

Unless we can find a way, and that quickly, to compose our differences and remove the impression which I tell you advisedly is gaining strong headway in North Carolina--that the Democratic General Assembly and the Democratic administration of North Carolina are impotent in a grave crisis to formulate a legislative revenue policy which will serve the well-being of this State--we have brought about a condition and a state of mind that is destructive of our welfare.

With the sharply defined differences which have marked your deliberations for 120 days, it is apparent that the achievement of this result demands a patriotic surrender of any pride of position. I come to say that, without surrendering any convictions, I am ready to lay on the altar of service to the State any pride of position which I have maintained. I wish to seek with you an immediate solvent of our divergent views, which will end the prolonged uncertainties, keep the wheels of government turning in orderly fashion, and permit our people to proceed with their own personal affairs in certain knowledge of what our laws will be.

The representatives of this great people, and the representatives of this great party, cannot and must not confess their inability to function and legislate with respect to the vital matters essential to the operations of government in all its functions. We must provide a legislative policy. We must provide appropriations to carry on. We must provide the revenues to sustain them, and we must provide them now. The demands that press upon us cannot be met by postponement or delay. We have already reached the point where we cannot further delay the achievement of these ends

-72-

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