Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

approval of the House. Now, as soon as three-fourths of the states vote approval of the pending amendment to the Constitution, a new chief executive of the United States will be inaugurated on January 20 after his election in November, and the new Congress chosen in November will begin to function on the 3rd of January, the amendment upon which Legislatures are to pass contains this provision:

"The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 3rd day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been ratified; and the terms of their successors shall then begin."

When thirty-six states vote "aye" the interval of marking time for four months will no longer impede prompt obedience to the recorded mandates of the people.

The present critical situation emphasizes the arguments heretofore presented for advancing the time of inauguration of the President and the organization of Congress. In a period when from ocean to ocean the people are insistent that the pledges made in the presidential campaign by the successful party be immediately redeemed, a stalemate stands between their expectation and the realization of their desires. An outgoing Congress does not feel itself bound to follow the decrees of an election in which many of them were retired. The outgoing President, not in sympathy with important items of the program of the President-elect, feels no compulsion to change the policies or the convictions which have controlled his action during his term of office. It has, therefore, often happened, that between November and March there is an impasse. In ordinary times this is to be deplored, but in crucial days like these in which we are now living it is serious. Delay halts action, and failure of quick action tends

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