Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

HEALTH PROMOTION WEEK AND CHILD
HEALTH DAY

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT
RALEIGH

A Proclamation by the Governor

Conscious of a genuine public interest in and desire for a healthier rising generation, and of the conspicuous successes already realized in the fields of medicine, sanitation, and positive health education programs, I believe that even greater improvement may yet be realized by the application of the knowledge now available. I believe, further, that coöperative community effort is the most effective agency in hastening the day when every child shall be born and reared under the best possible conditions which man can provide.

For these reasons and in harmony with the national policy to set aside May first as Child Health Day throughout the United States, it seems fitting and proper that a time should be set aside for the celebration of past health achievements and for the considertion of a program of all-round, balanced child development through focusing attention upon the proper procedures for health building and more permanent race improvement.

Now, therefore, I, O. Max Gardner, governor of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim and designate the week beginning Sunday, April 26, 1931, and the day Friday, May 1, 1931, respectively, or some subsequent week before Friday, October 31, 1931, as Health Promotion Week and Child Health Day and I invite and urge our people, especially those who are engaged officially, or as laymen, in promoting the public health and in welfare and civic betterment work, to observe these occasions by a whole-hearted and enthusiastic participation in every reasonable community effort put for

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