Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

wealth and city have achieved much that is distinctive and a source of prideful satisfaction for all the Southern people, I believe that nothing impresses the visitor more than the graciousness and charm of the hospitality found here.

Georgia and North Carolina have long been connected by intimate ties of kinship, history, and common traditions. These ties are as old as your devotion to these fine ideals of good sportsmanship which characterized the game today and they are as young as our common approach to tomorrow's problems. Georgia and North Carolina are situated close together geographically. They have almost identical economic outlooks and aspirations. Their pasts shine as bright threads frequently intertwined in the solid fabric of our country's history and their future looms increasingly large on the horizon of American progress and achievement. It augurs well, I think, that we should take advantage of these opportunities to give expression to that spirit of neighborliness and friendship which we feel for you and which we know you feel for us.

I speak tonight on a problem of growing concern to all the South. The problem is that of providing adequate financial support for our state institutions of higher learning. And I address my remarks peculiarly to the alumni and friends of these institutions.

This high privilege is rendered unique by the fact that the first state university to be chartered in America was the University of Georgia and the first to be opened was the University of North Carolina. Georgia and North Carolina, therefore, stand together tonight in happy union to consider the work for the realization of their early purposes, and to face the requirements, whatever they may be, of building here in the South a richer and more purposeful civilization.

The story of higher public education in the South is too long to be recited here, but it is a story of absorbing

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