Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

quainted with the way a session of the General Assembly would use up every particle of energy and drive of an executive. I confess now, however, that I must be a little older--I almost said less vigorous--than I was eight years ago when I had my last tussle with the General Assembly. One does pay for two months of unending nervous strain which a governor must go through with from January to March every two years.

As I thought about the meeting of your association here and realized the potential importance of the work of the superintendents to my administration, and to the educational and social well-being of North Carolina, I told the state superintendent that I wished to accept his invitation, and, as the chief executive of the state of North Carolina, to speak a word of welcome to you today.

I shall not tell you that I believe in public education for all children, or that I believe in the public school system and its leadership in North Carolina. Many of you heard and read my inaugural address, and those who did not, but who know anything of me--of my make-up and my ideals--know full well that I could not be any other kind of person.

Neither shall I undertake to explain to you in any detail the technical meaning of the school bill which has just been passed by the General Assembly. Most of you have discussed it among yourselves, with the state superintendent, your representative and with your people back home. Some of you may think very well of it, others not so well. Some of you may feel that section 7 takes precedence over section 17, or section 21 over section 11. I do not know anything about that. I do know that if I can read correctly the group mind or will of the Legislature, which has just gone home, it was not a body of men hostile to public education, or to our schools, or to you as administrators of our schools.

-152-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 788

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.