Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

of the state administration and express the hope that your conference will be fruitful in its important undertakings. I recognize the patriotic impulses which have brought you to Raleigh. From your deliberations much good should come, because many of the issues which are now in varied degrees of forwardness in the public thought of the State should be clarified by your discussions.

From time immemorial, it has been a custom of North Carolinians--self-reliant and self-directed--to assemble and express their views and criticisms or complaints freely and directly to the government and to the State as a whole. This practice stands out as a heartening fact about North Carolina citizenship, and also about North Carolina's political philosophy. Groups of like thought, and of like interest, I say, feel an utter freedom to carry their problems and their complaints to the government, if they have problems which they feel the government can aid in solving.

To the soundness of this custom and practice, I subscribe. Last fall, I headed a delegation of North Carolina farmers, time-merchants, and bankers who traveled to Washington to express to the Federal government their dissatisfaction with the prices they were being paid for their tobacco crop. Today, I am meeting with you for the purpose of laying before the governor and the state administration your complaint and criticism about our taxation situation and your proposed ways of dealing with the situation.

Your presence indicates your own great interest. This is shared by myself. My own personal and official interest in the welfare of North Carolina, I feel to be second to no one's. Thousands of our fellow citizens who are not here are also vitally interested in the problems which have brought us here, and will be benefited or hurt quite as much as we ourselves by the sound or the short-sighted conclusions we reach and the policies

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