Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

tinguished chief executives and agricultural and business leaders of our great sister states of the Southeast. North Carolina is honored by your presence within her borders and by your participation in a conference called to consider such of our problems as also happen to be your own.

It would be idle for me to attempt, in the short period of time at my disposal, to enumerate, or even to suggest, the reasons which contribute to make this welcome anything but perfunctory. Your states are so closely related to our State and your people to our people by age-old ties of kinship, history, and traditions that we are inclined to feel, that as with friends of long standing, the matter of hospitality is something to be taken for granted.

And surely if high comradeship in many a great enterprise may be assumed to promote mutual understanding and good will, the states represented here today have a secure basis of historic friendship and past associations upon which to build. As colonies of the British Crown, they more than once united to wage war upon the red man and did wage war upon him until his hostile tribes were subdued. Again they united in a war of revolution which brought political freedom and a place of honor, influence, and power in the councils of the new republic. Yet again, threequarters of a century later, they fought side by side to determine their own status as members of this Union. And finally, they have individually, and from a moral standpoint collectively waged unremitting warfare for the past seventy-five years upon the terrible poverty which came as an aftermath of the Civil War, and upon its twin accompanying evils of ignorance and despair. This latest conflict may yet be described in history as the 100 years war, but ultimate victory is already assured, and the enemy is in full flight before the militant hosts of Southern progress. A new spirit of confidence

-169-

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