Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

NORTH CAROLINA IS CALLING YOU

ADDRESS* DELIVERED BEFORE THE GRADUATING CLASS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILL, N. C.

JUNE 10, 1930

I can conceive of the University of North Carolina becoming one of the great power houses of the Nation in intellectual and social service through the fulness of its ministry to the life of this State. The new president of the University will have the unique opportunity of bringing to full fruition this conception of a state university, and I can think of no more constructive service or finer opportunity.

I congratulate you for being here, and for achieving this goal in preparation for worthy careers. Measured by every standard and weighed by every scale, you belong to a distinctive and select group. You are the refined product of a fifteen year period of ruthless--if sympathetic--selection. I congratulate you for having fathers and mothers willing to sacrifice in order for you to receive. I congratulate you for living in a commonwealth with the wisdom to encourage adequate preparation for constructive living. I congratulate you mainly on the opportunities that are yours. You will make your careers in what is, I believe, the most fascinating era in the world's history up to now.

Can you young fellows achieve during the next thirty years what the leaders of the past thirty years would achieve if they could take your places?

The most of you are graduating into life and work in North Carolina, but graduating with you and in a way graduating away from North Carolina is our president. After twenty years of service in this institution, during which time he rose from associate professor, to dean, to

____________________
*
This is not the entire address, but it is all that is available.

-196-

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