Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

this State. I say, then, that your problem, your point of view, your goal, is different from that of any group that I have addressed recently and that you warm my heart and stimulate my fancy with the idea that here is the ultimate way out for the agricultural industry of North Carolina. Perhaps dairy farming, together with the accompanying projects of livestock farming in general, and live-at-home farming, embracing substantially full production of all the feed and foodstuffs consumed by the farmers and ultimately by the entire population of North Carolina, really offers more hope to the present brow-beaten cotton and tobacco farmers and their tenants than it actually offers to you yourselves.

The farmers of this country are the source of this country's greatness, the foundation of its boasted enterprises, and with their raw material the support of our much wanted public revenue. Yet the farmers of North Carolina, and, in a large measure, of the rest of the Nation, are in the worst economic plight today than I have known in my lifetime. I believe that no one realizes more fully than I the grave import of the issues in the great economic struggle through which this basic industry is passing. This condition touches the life and well-being of every industry, every business, every profession, and every calling in this State. But it seems to me that it applies with the grimmest effect to the cash crop farmers of this State.

The cause of the present distressing and unprofitable price for cotton and tobacco, I shall not develop at length. You are one group of farmers in North Carolina who have learned in a practical way that regular and consistent overproduction of those two crops means starvation prices for the producers. I have never advised North Carolina farmers to give up the growing of cotton and tobacco. At present, I do believe that it would be wise. But I have urged all over North

-232-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 788

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.