Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

NOT PESSIMISTIC AS TO FUTURE

ADDRESS* DELIVERED BEFORE THE STATE COUNCIL ON UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF RALEIGH, N. C.

DECEMBER 2, 1930

I congratulate you on your patriotic response to an urgent call from the State.

North Carolina can see vividly the signs of depression, because the last thing a person gives up or retires is an automobile, and in this State 30,000 have been retired in eleven months of 1930.

This means a loss to the State of $400,000 in license tag revenue and more than $1,000,000 in total revenue, and a similar decrease is being seen in every tax the State collects.

I am not pessimistic toward the future, but I feel we must consciously recognize the present condition. North Carolina has gone through worse conditions, and has won out.

I am sure the organized consciousness of this State will respond to the needs of the unfortunate at this time, but I do not hesitate to say, after an intensive and careful study, we are facing the most critical period since the Civil War, and the individuals and institutions of the State must realize the condition.

There must be a relation between income and expenditures, and the way to win this fight is to recognize that we must adjust our expenditures to our incomes.

Today the State has exhausted its ability to build and contemplates its inability to pay.

____________________
*
This is not the entire address, but it is all that is available. John B. Blandford, a member of President Hoover's committee on unemployment, also addressed the meeting. Mr. Blandford discussed the means and methods employed throughout the country for relief. Governor Gardner announced he was ready to recommend $5,000 for financing relief work. He also urged that all employers keep their workers employed for the next four months.

-243-

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