Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

inherent part of the broad program of reorganization submitted after months of earnest, dispassionate study and consideration of the present situation and conditions obtaining in North Carolina. It was recommended with a view to providing the largest service to the largest groups of the State's citizenship, It has the unqualified endorsement and approval of the leading authorities in the State and Nation on roads and highways, including Frank Page, former chairman of the State Highway Commission, Leslie Ames, former chief engineer for the Highway Commission, and Thomas H. MacDonald, chief of the Bureau of Public Roads of the United States. It has the backing of a number of the present state highway commissioners and of many able county commissioners throughout North Carolina.

Tonight I wish to present for your information the fundamental provisions of the road bill and to show you the opportunities which its adoption would afford for improving the service now offered by our state highway and county road systems, the economies it affords, and the decreased cost by which it will be possible to make substantial reductions in the property tax burden under which the taxpayers of this State are now struggling.

I want the citizens of North Carolina to understand the meaning of this road bill. I want you to know what it will do for the improvement of our system of transportation and for the decrease of our tax bill. I want you to know what this bill will do for you, because there are represented here in Raleigh many powerful minority groups who know full well what it will do to them and who do not mean to let it pass if they have the power through persuasion, indirection, and muddying the issues to prevent its passage. I am not blaming them. Throughout my public career I have recognized and championed the right of any

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