Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

and among strangers. Tonight will be the second time in more than six months that I have spoken over the radio on any subject that did not deal with some aspect of the work of the 1931 Legislature. And it will be the first time I have spoken to North Carolina when my mind has not been occupied with legislative and administrative problems, and I feel free to unbosom myself and give utterance to the thoughts that are inherently near to my heart. I do feel tonight that I have again come home to my people.

Now that we have done the best job which we could legislatively do, and, on the whole, a first class job, I feel a new faith and optimism. And I believe this optimism permeates the whole State because we now have the opportunity to put our collective shoulders to the wheel and push and work for North Carolina rather than to legislate for North Carolina.

"Carolina Echoes." That is a suggestive phrase that our radio friends of the Durham Life Insurance Company have coined. In spite of the saying that a rose by "any other name would smell as sweet," I like distinctive names. I like suggestive phrases. And I should like to congratulate Radio Station WPTF for their civic mindedness in setting aside a half hour weekly to be used in bringing to the people of North Carolina a constructive message about the work, needs, and possibilities of North Carolina. And I also wish to congratulate some imaginative youngster for picking up the suggestive phrase "Carolina Echoes."

As I understand it, the central purpose of this series of weekly talks and entertainment is to build up in the thoughts of the people of this State the idea that the State itself has limitless resources and opportunities for the constructive exploitation of the people of North Carolina, and to give hope and courage to our people to use our resources and our opportunities to the fullest.

From week to week you will hear from this station

-313-

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