Public Papers and Letters of Oliver Max Gardner: Governor of North Carolina, 1929-1933

By Edwin Gill; David Leroy Corbitt | Go to book overview

affairs and the whole reorganization of our state government, the General Assembly of our State invited Governor Harry Byrd to come to North Carolina and address the General Assembly. It was through his presentation of the problems of Virginia and the efforts of this great Commonwealth to solve those problems that North Carolina was enabled to solve her problems; and, while I am not privileged to speak for the state of North Carolina with respect to her political preferences and her attitude in regard to the matter, I do not hesitate to say I would rather see Governor Harry Byrd President of the United States than any man in America. I am pleased to be here, too, to enjoy again the hospitality of your distinguished governor; and if I thought that he was going through the same travail through which I went last year, I would come and commiserate with him.

In North Carolina we have been engaged, since the fall of 1929, in trying to bring about a readjustment and a reorganization of our governmental affairs. As I addressed the General Assembly at that period, when the full weight, power, and significance of this depression had fallen upon the Commonwealth, I used this expression--as I recall it, I said: "We are face to face with the supreme test of our collective common sense, of our intellectual and moral courage, and of our faith in the essential soundness of this Commonwealth."

I am sure that with two states as closely related and having as many things in common as North Carolina and Virginia, you, gentlemen must realize today that you are face to face with the supreme test of your collective common sense, of your intellectual and moral courage, and of your faith in the essential soundness of this Commonwealth. This period through which we are passing has brought to the attention of governments everywhere the realization that uneasy lies the head that wears the crown of political responsibility,

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